Tag Archives: nutrition

Physical Fitness for your Fiscal Fitness

*Ok, so a friend of mine is a health and fitness expert, and the blog post last week gave him an idea.  His name is Bert Wray and we decided to write this joint blog article. I hope it has some good info for you. Read the rest of his blog at icoachu4life.com*

We all have our own barometer for success. Those that achieve it carefully map out their goals and constantly work in pursuit of that next benchmark. There is nothing wrong with maintaining a laundry list of goals, but they all have to intertwine and relate to one another in some way. They should be prioritized based on the need or desire to achieve that specific goal over another.

For just about all of us, the top dog is cash money! Money is the ultimate enabler. They say it can’t buy happiness, but it certainly tough going without it. If you’re idea of achieving financial success involves a scratch-off ticket: WAKE-UP!! Financially successful is not the same as filthy rich. Maintaining a comfortable lifestyle within your means should be your part of your goal. Professionally, you have to make the most of every opportunity to ensure that you are in position to advance in your career and receive the benefits of those advancements. Understand how investing in yourself, as well as your finances, will propel you to the success you dream of. How does physical fitness relate to your financial success?

The Benefits Package: When interviewing for a new company or position, everyone is eager to know all the benefits available. Yet, when coming to the gym, you focus on one aspect of physical fitness benefits; weight management. How can you be so detail-oriented with one and narrow-minded with another?

We all know that regular exercise, coupled with reasonable nutrition, will help to manage our weight, increase strength and stamina, and tone muscle. Those are important, but the psychological effects of an effective exercise program are the true link to helping you achieve inside and outside of the gym. Generically, exercise boosts your energy levels. In reality, the effects of exercise on the brain is still being researched to completely pin down the true effects.

Why is exercise good for the brain? There are several possibilities:

* increasing the blood and oxygen flow to the brain
* increasing growth factors that help create new nerve cells and
* increasing chemicals in the brain that improve cognitive skills, such as dopamine, glutamate, norepinephrine, and serotonin

In other words, exercise can sharpen your skills, increase your alertness, and even act somewhat as an anti-depressant. All of which are essential in today’s professional arena.

Additionally, health clubs are an excellent networking opportunity. You never know who you may meet that could lead to your next big closing or even your next position. You must stay alert and focused to recognize opportunities. Once you recognize opportunity, you have to be willing to seize it.

Now that your exercise and nutrition plans are on track, what can you do to further advance your financial success? Just as you would look to a health and wellness expert for fitness advice, get your financial advice from a financial expert.

Michael Kothakota, CEO of Wolfbridge Financial, works daily to improve the livelihood of his clients. The following are fundamentals necessary to establish sound practices that will drive you to successfully achieving your personal financial goals:

The first step to achieving your financial goals is to actually have a plan. Now, when we talk about plans, we aren’t saying that they shouldn’t change or be set in stone. Financial plans are guidelines that you follow on your way to reaching your financial goals. As Bert said, you can’t be single-minded and focus on one thing. Most fitness goals require a comprehensive plan, and like fitness goals, financial goals can be complicated as well.

So, how do you get started?

First, organize your financial documents. When things are spread out all over the place, it becomes difficult to actually get anything done. Procrastination occurs, and then you are no further along than when you started. There are many filing systems that you can utilize. You can mirror one at work, use an electronic filing method (if that works for you), or you can create one.

Next, create a chart, table, spreadsheet with the organized financial information contained within. Separate your long-term investments from your shorter term money (checking, money market, etc.). Create a balance sheet that lists your assets and liabilities. Subtract your liabilities from your assets, and voila! You now have your net worth.

Don’t be afraid of the number. The important part is that you are now organized and have a good handle on your financial position. What’s next?

Budget. Developing a budget is fairly easy, but we make it difficult. Simply add together all income you have. Next, add together all fixed expenses such as your mortgage, car payment, student loan payments, etc. Variable expenses are a little trickier, but you can estimate with fair accuracy by averaging the past three months of variable expenses (water, sewer, gas, gasoline, etc.) and using that number to estimate a fair expense. Subtract both your variable and fixed expenses from your income and you now have a decent budget.

The next steps are fairly simple. If you have revolving debt, pay it off. There are all sorts of online tools that will help you do this. Most people pay off higher interest debt first, but I prefer that you payoff the smallest debt first. Why? Psychologically, it is fulfilling. It will encourage you to pay off the other debts quickly.

Once you have paid off your revolving debt, move onto creating an emergency fund. Three months salary is usually sufficient, but comfort level can come into play. Some people prefer six months or even twelve months.

Finally, you can move onto investments. If you have a 401k at work, or existing investments, unless you are a financial savant (in which case this half of the article is useless to you), please consult an investment advisor. A lot of 401k’s are offering this service for free for the employees. Or you can hire someone to look over your accounts and make sure that your investments are tracking our long-term goals.

Remember, the first step is to get organized. After that, it all becomes easy. Don’t let the overwhelming nature of financial issues stop you from seizing control

We all have our own barometer for success. Those that achieve it carefully map out their goals and constantly work in pursuit of that next benchmark. There is nothing wrong with maintaining a laundry list of goals, but they all have to intertwine and relate to one another in some way. They should be prioritized based on the need or desire to achieve that specific goal over another.

For just about all of us, the top dog is cash money! Money is the ultimate enabler. They say it can’t buy happiness, but it certainly tough going without it. If you’re idea of achieving financial success involves a scratch-off ticket: WAKE-UP!! Financially successful is not the same as filthy rich. Maintaining a comfortable lifestyle within your means should be your part of your goal. Professionally, you have to make the most of every opportunity to ensure that you are in position to advance in your career and receive the benefits of those advancements. Understand how investing in yourself, as well as your finances, will propel you to the success you dream of. How does physical fitness relate to your financial success?

The Benefits Package: When interviewing for a new company or position, everyone is eager to know all the benefits available. Yet, when coming to the gym, you focus on one aspect of physical fitness benefits; weight management. How can you be so detail-oriented with one and narrow-minded with another?

We all know that regular exercise, coupled with reasonable nutrition, will help to manage our weight, increase strength and stamina, and tone muscle. Those are important, but the psychological effects of an effective exercise program are the true link to helping you achieve inside and outside of the gym. Generically, exercise boosts your energy levels. In reality, the effects of exercise on the brain is still being researched to completely pin down the true effects.

Why is exercise good for the brain? There are several possibilities:

· increasing the blood and oxygen flow to the brain

· increasing growth factors that help create new nerve cells and

· increasing chemicals in the brain that improve cognitive skills, such as dopamine, glutamate, norepinephrine, and serotonin

In other words, exercise can sharpen your skills, increase your alertness, and even act somewhat as an anti-depressant. All of which are essential in today’s professional arena.

Additionally, health clubs are an excellent networking opportunity. You never know who you may meet that could lead to your next big closing or even your next position. You must stay alert and focused to recognize opportunities. Once you recognize opportunity, you have to be willing to seize it.

Now that your exercise and nutrition plans are on track, what can you do to further advance your financial success? Just as you would look to a health and wellness expert for fitness advice, get your financial advice from a financial expert.

Michael Kothakota, CEO of Wolfbridge Financial, works daily to improve the livelihood of his clients. The following are tips and tricks to establish sound practices that will drive you to successfully achieving your personal financial goals.

The first step to achieving your financial goals is to actually have a plan. Now, when we talk about plans, we aren’t saying that they shouldn’t change or be set in stone. Financial plans are guidelines that you follow on your way to reaching your financial goals. As Bert said, you can’t be single-minded and focus on one thing. Most fitness goals require a comprehensive plan, and like fitness goals, financial goals can be complicated as well.

So, how do you get started?

The first thing you should do is organize your financial documents. When things are spread out all over the place, it becomes difficult to actually get anything done. Procrastination occurs, and then you are no further along than when you started. There are many filing systems that you can utilize. You can mirror one at work, use an electronic filing method (if that works for you), or you can create one.

Next, create a chart, table, spreadsheet with the organized financial information contained within. Separate your long-term investments from your shorter term money (checking, money market, etc.). Create a balance sheet that lists your assets and liabilities. Subtract your liabilities from your assets, and voila! You now have your net worth.

Don’t be afraid of the number. The important part is that you are now organized and have a good handle on your financial position. What’s next?

Budget. Developing a budget is fairly easy, but we make it difficult. Simply add together all income you have. Next, add together all fixed expenses such as your mortgage, car payment, student loan payments, etc. Variable expenses are a little trickier, but you can estimate with fair accuracy by averaging the past three months of variable expenses (water, sewer, gas, gasoline, etc.) and using that number to estimate a fair expense. Subtract both your variable and fixed expenses from your income and you now have a decent budget.

The next steps are fairly simple. If you have revolving debt, pay it off. There are all sorts of online tools that will help you do this. Most people pay off higher interest debt first, but I prefer that you payoff the smallest debt first. Why? Psychologically, it is fulfilling. It will encourage you to pay off the other debts quickly.

Once you have paid off your revolving debt, move onto creating an emergency fund. Three months salary is usually sufficient, but comfort level can come into play. Some people prefer six months or even twelve months.

Finally, you can move onto investments. If you have a 401k at work, or existing investments, unless you are a financial savant (in which case this half of the article is useless to you), please consult an investment advisor. A lot of 401k’s are offering this service for free for the employees. Or you can hire someone to look over your accounts and make sure that your investments are tracking our long-term goals.

Remember, the first step is to get organized. After that, it all becomes easy. Don’t let the overwhelming nature of financial issues stop you from seizing control.